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About Us 2

“Our passion are skill, our expertise is in engineering. From startups to Fortune, we consult on product testing and design for mass production.”
sviwuevz
Southern Africa Youth Project is a regional Youth Development non-profit organisation that aims to empower and development communities through giving them to access Technology, Education, Health and Employment.
Southern Africa Youth Project is a registered Non-Profit Organisation with its headquartered based in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Southern Africa Youth Project is providing youth development activities and projects throughout the Southern Africa Region.
Southern Africa Youth Project works in its own sites and local implementing partners through a network of partnerships, consortium and coalitions providing wide range of services based on the needs of and challenges of each community.
Southern Africa Youth Project operates in the whole of Africa with a major focus on the Southern African Development Community.
We work with national, regional, provincial, district and local governments, business, individuals, philanthropists, donors, foundations and locally based non-profit organisation to address community challenges.
In delivering its work Southern Africa Youth Project works with a local grassroots non-profit organisation through providing capacity building, co-funding, project management, monitoring and evaluation.
We believe in working on collaboration rather than replicating what is already there. We also understand that development requires those who are locally based to address them. We believe that those born in those communities can address their challenges better than someone who just visits
Southern Africa Youth Project believes that  local people are the only people who can address their own challenges and problems.
Southern Africa Youth projects adopts a multi-faceted community development approach where in its implementation of work and services. it engages communities where the services are provided from strategic planning, implementation to monitoring and evaluation as a whole.
Southern Africa Youth Project has implemented a structured set of policies and systems that governs all its operations. this is from quality management, program implementation, finance, human resources, marketing, communications, administration and governance

Before we get ahead of ourselves, we want to welcome you to Skilled. While nothing can replace thing on-the-lot experience.

We appreciate you taking the time today to visit our web site. Our goal is to give you an interactive tour of our new and used inventory, as well as allow you to conveniently get a quote, schedule a service appointment, or apply for financing. The search for a luxury car is filled with high expectations. Undoubtedly, that has a lot to do with the vehicles you are considering, but at Motors, we think you should also have pretty high expectations for your dealership.
Our goal is to give you an interactive tour of our new and used inventory, as well as allow you to conveniently get a quote, schedule a service appointment, or apply for financing. The search for a luxury car is filled with high expectations. Undoubtedly, that has a lot to do with the vehicles you are considering, but at Motors, we think you should also have pretty high expectations for your dealership.

— TANIA ANDREWS, Owner of Skilled

Southern Africa youth project Neftaly Malatjie

DAVID ANDREWS

INSTRUCTOR
Southern Africa Youth Project Clifford Legodi

THORSTEN TAILOR

INSTRUCTOR
Southern Africa Youth Project Nancy Nghonyama

DANA ANDREWS

INSTRUCTOR

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Southern Africa Youth Project is registered as follows:

Registered as a Non-Profit Organisation with the Department of Social Development

Registered as a Non-Profit Company with CIPC

Registered as a Tax exempt Non-profit Organisation with SARS

Registered with CSD Central Supplier Database of National Treasury

Registered with UIF Unemployment Insurance Fund

Registered with European Union PIC as EU PIC Registered Institution

Registered and compliant with the South African Revenue Service

Registered as a Non-Profit Organisation with Department of Social Development

Non Profit Organisation Registered

Registered as a Non Profit Company CIPC Registered Institution

Compensation Fund COIDA Registered

United States D-U-N-S Duns registered

Registered with the United States SAM Registered

Southern Africa Youth Project takes Governance and Accountability seriously.

Therefore the organisation is governed by Board of Trustees, Board of Directors, Board of Advisor, Non Executive Members, Divisions Special Advisor. Southern Africa Youth Project periodically conducts internal audits to ensure that it complies with Revenue Services, National Regulators, National Registrars, International Administration, Management, Marketing, Public Finance. Monitoring and Evaluation of its Impact.

Southern Africa Youth Project cannot do this alone except with the involvement of independent community leaders who are providing strategic guidance, advisory, monitoring and Evaluation

Southern Africa Youth Project is a registered non-profit company with registrations in South Africa. Southern Africa Youth Project has its headquarters in the City of Johannesburg, Gauteng Province in South Africa.

We are registered as a Non-Profit Company in terms of section 71 of Companies Act. Southern Africa Youth Project is obliged in terms of this act to have Directors and Non-Executive Directors who serves as overseers of the work that is being done for communities. Southern Africa Youth Project complies with the Public Finance Management Act.

Southern Africa Youth Project complies to the following:

International Accounting Standards

Southern Africa Youth Project manages its finances in line with the International Accounting regulations therefore we use online Accounting Systems supported by physical papers. Southern Africa Youth Project ensures that it keeps all records of expenditures in line with the donors who are supporting us

Non-Profit Act and Companies Act

Southern Africa Youth Project is registered by three (3) authorities. It is registered as a Non-Profit Organisation in terms of Non-Profit Act of 1997. The registration has been done with the Department of Social Development.

Labour Relations and Employment Equity:

Southern Africa Youth Project complies with country labour relations. Therefore, we ensure that we comply with Basic Conditions of Employment Act, Employment Equity, Labour Relations, Department of Labour regulations to ensure that we are in line and follow any updates as per specified by countries

Constitutional Mandate:

Southern Africa Youth Project is managed by a Constitution and Memorandum of Incorporation which is supported by the internal policies, procedures and systems that the organisation is using to implement its operations.

Non-Profit Act and Companies Act:

Southern Africa Youth Project has been registered as a Non-Profit Company in terms of Companies Act. The organisation has been registered with CIPC in South Africa.

Employees Taxations:

Southern Africa Youth Project deducts amounts as per country tax authorities this is to ensure that our employees declare their incomes to governments and national revenue services

Public Benefit Act:

Southern Africa Youth Project is registered as a Public Benefit Organisation in terms of Section 18A. Therefore, all of the organisations funds and income goes for public benefit.

Public Finance Management Act

Southern Africa Youth Project understands that the funds we are using are the for the public. Therefore we need to account to the public and ensure that all contributions giving to us are using only for the benefit of the public

Income Tax Act:

Southern Africa Youth Project is registered for Income Tax. We declare our income to the Revenue Services on an annual basis.

Tax Relief:

Since Southern Africa Youth Project is a Tax Exempt Institution we benefit from relief from Income Tax, organisational tax and property taxes.

Record Keeping:

All records of the organisation are always available for scrutiny by the public

National Qualification Frameworks:

 Southern Africa Youth Project uses qualified and experienced staff members to manage its operations

Tax Exemption:

Southern Africa Youth Project is registered as a Tax Exempt Non-Profit Organisation. When we received a donation from Companies, Trusts, Governments, Individuals all of them receives reduced tax income. Our Tax Exemption Status provides companies from tax, reduced rates, or tax on their contribution to Southern Africa Youth Project.

Transparency

Southern Africa Youth Project conducts its operations in an open manner which means that the organisation does not have anything to hide. We do not keep anything confidential from bank statements, transactions, expenditure records, financials, operations, programmes and all the operations of the organisation

It is imperative that the high level of youth unemployment is taken into account in planning South Africa’s economic growth path: the lack of inclusive growth severely limits absorption of young people into the labour market, while low participation of young people in the economy constrains future economic growth. This undesirable outcome will have profoundly harmful consequences for poverty levels, equity,

social stability and the self worth of unemployed people. In South Africa, there are a number of factors that act as disincentives to the employment of new labour market entrants. While there was some level of disagreement, principal issues highlighted included: lack of appropriate skills, high wages (in relation to productivity), high training costs and inflexible labour legislation?

Social culture and youth unemployment

Given that South Africa’s growth path has not been creating jobs at the magnitude required to absorb the stock of unemployed that have built up, as well as new labour market entrants, there is not enough social pressure or market incentive to encourage young people out of dependence on their families and into economic activity. From a strategic point of view, it is complex to solve the entire problem in the short-term. Rather, an imperative is to create more hope that there are productive activities young  people can engage in, in order to foster a new dynamic in society. The latter will improve employability,

job creation and the quality of labour supply. This must be considered within the priority to create jobs to absorb unemployed youth.

A critical aspect of the failure of young people to transition from school to work is that unemployment has become embedded in South Africa’s socio-economic culture. Some Round table participants held the view that households and communities have come to expect young people to remain unemployed and unproductive for a considerable period of time after leaving school impacting negatively on expectations and behavior.

Consequence of education system failures

Inputs to this Round table by presenters and participants consistently emphasized how the education system fails to produce employable people with the skills required to navigate their way through the modern labour market. Hence programs to deploy and employ young people are an ex post response to an education system that is failing to equip young people for work.

The poor quality of the basic education system is devastating young people’s lives. This crisis is understood, acknowledged and prioritized by government. The key intervention would be to ensure that the R150 billion currently spent on the system each year is utilized more effectively leading to improved outcomes. Programs of post-school institutions aimed at addressing the consequences of a failing education system will never be resourced at this scale.

The education system generally fails to prepare young people with fundamental literacy, numeracy, problem solving, and critical thinking skills, neither does it encourage acquisition of values such as a work ethic and self-discipline that are required in the workplace. In addition, unemployed young people are a highly diverse group with different levels of educational attainment combined with the challenges posed by the diverse settings in which they were schooled and currently live. This means that in the context of the current labour market, it is almost impossible for employers to establish which new labour market entrants that have completed secondary education are best equipped to enter the world of work.

Outside of tertiary education, this is true at all levels of educational attainment. Hence, it is necessary to stratify and segment this group in terms of their skills, context and possibilities. Then appropriate and differentiated programs can be developed to target each of the segments based on their needs.

Labour market inter-mediation

It is a striking contradiction that alongside high and growing levels of unemployment, neither the public nor the private sector in South Africa is able to fill existing vacancies. South Africa does not have the programmes and institutions to create a pathway for new labour market entrants into the world of work, which is in contrast to best practice in other countries where active labour market policies address all aspects of the frictional unemployment confronted by young people including: vocational counselling at school, training for acquisition of ‘soft skills’, wage subsidies for employers, and placement services targeted at youth

Targeting new entrants

Young people searching for their first job are a primary challenge that requires solutions. The school to-work transition is difficult when not supported by employers, nor by private or public sector labour market intermediaries such as placement agencies. As a result, most young people are forced to seek work opportunities through their own social networks that may have be restricted to a group of people employed in a narrow range of occupations. There is concern about the likelihood of growing dependency on publicly supported labour market interventions where large numbers of first jobs are dependent on state intervention. Consequently, the efficacy of public programmes to support new labour market entrants was identified as a critical consideration.

Processes to bring young people into the labour market require a ‘developmental’ approach. Dedicated youth programmes need to target youth and then effectively screen, select and place them. Anecdotal evidence suggests that private placement agencies for young people are growing in number, but that placement costs are staggering: in one example 600 young people were screened in order to select and place one person in a job. Innovation is urgently required in the placement process to reduce costs and to more effectively target young people who are relatively more ‘employable’.

Costs

The cost of the transition from school to work is high. The lesson of the 18th and 19th century apprenticeship model – where employers paid to put someone through an apprenticeship – is that employers offering training opportunities incur a range of costs. To incentive’s training therefore requires that society has to have a strategy for meeting those costs. One of the burning issues is that in South Africa we do not have a joint strategy to meet these costs, so that their distribution across the public and private sectors is not addressed.

As issued by DBSA 2001

the future of digital jobs in south africa

    Sub-Saharan Africa is home to 13% of the world’s working age population; a number that is set to increase to more than 17% by 2030, the world’s second largest after Asia. With more than 60% of its population under the age of 25, Sub-Saharan Africa is already the world’s youngest region today – and, by 2030, will be home to more than one-quarter of the world’s total under-25 population. Over this period, the region is projected to expand the size of its workforce by more than the rest of the world combined, as its young population, the best-educated and globally<br />connected the continent has ever had, enters the world of work.

 

By leveraging this demographic opportunity, SubSaharan Africa has the potential to unleash new economic possibilities created by future industries and labour markets, dramatically raising labour productivity and per capita incomes, diversifying its economy, and becoming an engine for stable economic growth, high-skilled talent and job creation for decades to come. Today, however, Sub-Saharan Africa is far removed from making optimal use of its human capital potential and under-prepared for the impending disruption to jobs and skills brought about by the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
The World Economic Forum’s Human Capital Index, which measures the extent to which countries and economies optimize their human capital through education and skills development and its deployment throughout the life-course, finds that Sub-Saharan Africa, on average, currently only captures 55% of its full human capital potential, compared to a global average of 65%, ranging
from 67 to 63% in Mauritius, Ghana and South Africa.

The World Economic Forum’s analysis also finds that the
region’s capacity to adapt to the requirements of future
jobs—measured by assessing the quality and extent
of its education and staff training systems, post-basic
education attainment and breadth of skills—relative to the
region’s exposure to these future trends—measured by
assessing the impact of latest technologies, local economic
diversification and complexity, employee productivity
and unemployment—leave little space for complacency
(Figure 3). While a number of African economies are
relatively less exposed to technologically-driven labour
market disruptions, this picture is changing rapidly. Urgent
efforts for closing the continent’s skills gap will be needed.
This Executive Briefing on the future of jobs and skills
in Sub-Saharan Africa is intended as a practical guide
for leaders from business, government, civil society and
the education sector, including, but not limited to, those
participating in the World Economic Forum’s Africa Skills
Initiative. Utilizing the latest available data, including through
a research partnership with LinkedIn, it provides a concise
overview of the region’s emerging opportunities and
challenges with regard to shaping the future jobs and skills
agenda and concrete recommendations for priority action.
It concludes with an overview of – and a call to action to
join – the Africa Skills Initiative to prepare the region to
seize the opportunities of future jobs and skills demand.

Labour market overview
In recent years, Sub-Saharan Africa has recorded
rapid economic growth. Six of the ten fastest-growing
economies in the world over the last decade are from
the region, which is set to double the size of its economy
by 2030 if these trends continue.4 Income levels and the
complexity of local economic activity have been increasing
concurrently, from a comparatively low base, including
among many of Africa’s most populous countries such
as Nigeria, Ethiopia, South Africa, Tanzania, Kenya and
Uganda (Figure 4). South Africa, Mauritius, Senegal and
Kenya are the regions’ economies with the highest degree
of diversification and complexity.
Labour force participation in the region is high and
characterized by the generally strong economic
participation of women. However, more significant
workforce participation gender gaps remain in countries
such as Mauritius, Mali, Côte d’Ivoire and Nigeria (Figure 5).
While the region’s rapid economic growth, dynamic young
population and high labour force participation hold much
promise, challenges remain when it comes to the creation
of quality, formal sector jobs. On average, Sub-Saharan
Africa exhibits a high-skilled employment share of just
6%, a contrast to the global average of 24%. Some of
the most common types of high-skilled employment on
the continent include business analysts, school teachers

and academics, commercial bankers, accountants,
human resources, marketing and operations specialists,
customer service specialists, advertising professionals,
information technology workers and software and app
developers, according to LinkedIn’s data. Countries such
as South Africa, Mauritius and Botswana lead the way
in the local availability of high-skilled jobs while others,
such as Ethiopia and Nigeria, maintain large proportions
of workers in lower-skilled jobs (Figure 6). Formal sector
unemployment rates are often high—including among
recent secondary school and university graduates—in
countries as diverse as South Africa, Nigeria, Mozambique
and Senegal (Figure 5). While formal sector employment
did grow in Sub-Saharan Africa over the past two decades,
this job growth has simply not kept pace with population
growth, resulting in fewer opportunities in the formal labour
market for the increasing numbers of Africa’s young school
and university graduates.
Where Africans are employed in the formal sector, this
employment tends to be in smaller-sized firms with
limited resources to invest in upskilling and reskilling
opportunities (Figure 7). In addition, a sizeable number
of Africans continue to work in the informal economy

on family farms and in urban self-employment – usually
sectors where the skills of the newly secondary or tertiary
educated are least value-adding and, particularly in rural
areas, where they often least aspire to work.5 This limited
success in capitalizing on its existing education investment
to date goes to the heart of the region’s relatively poor
performance on the Forum’s Human Capital Index
(Figure 2).
At the same time, large numbers of African employers are
citing inadequately skilled workforces as a major constraint
to business expansion (Figure 8). This points to a double
bind. In addition to the mismatch between the number of
educated young people seeking jobs and the availability of
formal, high-quality jobs, there is the added constraint of
young people being inadequately prepared for such roles.
Closer dialogue between education providers and industry
is needed to align and optimize the region’s demand and
supply of skills.6 Additionally, the continent’s employers
and educators need better tools to enable them to better
understand labour markets’ new and emerging skills
requirement

Closing Africa’s data gap to close its skills gap
Reliable and timely data on the structure of employment
and skills in Sub-Saharan Africa is difficult to obtain. There
is scarce information on the number of existing jobs, of
newly created jobs, and of unfilled vacancies in specific
sectors, undermining efforts to systematically assess
and develop the continent’s skills base.7 To produce
this Executive Briefing, a wide range of traditional and
innovative data sources were consulted to provide the most
complete picture possible. Nevertheless, initiatives aimed
at closing skills gaps can only be so effective if they are
hampered by parallel data gaps. To maximize opportunities
to build future skills, initiatives aimed directly at improving
data collection—including on work in the region’s informal
sector8—are also needed. This need not mean simply
copying methods used in other countries.9 Instead, African
governments, with the help of private sector stakeholders,
have an opportunity to develop tailored approaches
to understanding the region’s evolving skills base and
emerging jobs scenarios. Limited data also hinders deeper
understanding of gender gaps across the region, as many
African economies lack data on progression of women
across higher-skilled and senior roles, making it hard to
gain a more nuanced understanding of both halves of the
region’s talent.

 

 

The future of jobs
An estimated 15 to 20 million increasingly well-educated
young people are expected to join the African workforce
every year for the next three decades. Delivering the
quality jobs to match in order to fully leverage the
continent’s demographic opportunity is set to be one of
Sub-Saharan Africa’s defining challenges over the coming
years. Simultaneously, the Fourth Industrial Revolution
will interact with a range of additional socio-economic
and demographic factors affecting the region, resulting in
major disruptions to labour markets, growth in wholly new
occupations, new ways of organizing and coordinating
work, new skills requirements in all jobs and new tools to
augment workers’ capabilities (Figure 14).
Sub-Saharan Africa stands at a crossroads regarding its
future development path, with a range of opportunities
to invest in its skills base, leveraging existing strengths
to increase local value-add across a broad range of
industries. Investment in specialist skills and local talent
in the building and construction trades due to rapid
urbanization and a continent-wide need for infrastructure
development is one obvious example. Additional demand
for specialist skills and local talent in consumer industries
such as agriculture, food and beverages, home and
personal care, apparel and transport and automotive,
expanding rapidly due to the region’s growing population,
is another.13 As the Fourth Industrial Revolution unfolds,
Sub-Saharan Africa is also poised to develop new business
models on the basis of these technologies.14 Innovations
such as mobile payments systems like M-Pesa in financial
services, the use of drones for last mile delivery in
transportation and logistics and the development of a wide
range of digital applications tailored to Africa’s continued
importance and unique strengths in agriculture point to the
growth of these new aspects in the region’s economy.15
What is likely to be the jobs impact of these changes?
Much as in more economically advanced world regions,
concerns have recently been raised regarding the potential
impact of automation on jobs on the continent. It has
been estimated that, from a technological standpoint,
41% of all work activities in South Africa are susceptible to
automation, as are 44% in Ethiopia, 46% in Nigeria, 48%
in Mauritius, 52% in Kenya and 53% in Angola.16 However,
these effects are likely to be moderated by comparatively
lower wages and slower technology adoption.

In addition, whether jobs are declining, stable or growing,
they are going through major changes to their skills profile.
The World Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs analysis found
that, just in South Africa alone, 39% of core skills required
across all occupations will be different by 2020 as compared
to what was needed to perform those roles in 2015.17
At the same time, across the continent, substantial
potential exists for creating high value-adding formal sector
jobs in a number of areas.
While the Fourth Industrial Revolution may be disruptive
to many occupations, it is also projected to create a wide
range of new jobs in fields such as STEM, data analysis,
computer science and engineering. There will be strong
demand for professionals who can blend digital and
STEM skills with traditional subject expertise, such as
digital-mechanical engineers and business operations
data analysts, who combine deep knowledge of their
industry with the latest analytical tools to quickly adapt
business strategies. There will also be more demand for
user interface experts, who can facilitate seamless humanmachine interaction.18 For Sub-Saharan Africa, the greatest
long-term benefits of such jobs are likely to be found in
the promotion of home-grown African digital creators,
designers and makers, not just digital deliverers.

 

However, future job growth will not be limited to the
technology sector alone. Investment in Sub-Saharan
Africa’s enormous infrastructure needs, such as
improvements in the continent’s transport networks,
is booming. While the potential benefits of such “hard”
infrastructure investments are well-recognized, economists
predict equivalent or greater – often untapped – job
creation potential of investments in countries’ “soft”
infrastructure of childcare, eldercare and education, which
also often produce more gender-balanced labour market
outcomes. For example, the direct and indirect job creation
effects of an investment of 2% of GDP in South Africa
would amount to 511,000 jobs in construction (with 29.6%
of direct jobs going to women) and 414,000 jobs in care
(with 61.4% of direct jobs going to women).20 Investing
in the care economy also dovetails with the recognized
importance of early-childhood education for human capital
development. In addition, millions of new teachers will also
be needed across the continent.21
The transition to a more ecologically sustainable economic
model also has the potential to create millions of new jobs
globally, including in Sub-Saharan Africa. For example, it
is estimated that by 2025 South Africa alone could create
462,000 additional jobs by “going green”, including in clean
energy generation, energy efficiency, pollution control and
natural resource management. Similar estimates exist for
countries such as Mauritius, Namibia, Kenya, Senegal,
Uganda and Zambia.22
Finally, regardless of sector or occupation, new work
formats are offering individuals and entrepreneurs new
opportunities. Online platform work is on the rise globally,
including in Sub-Saharan Africa. For example, the continent
currently has 56 e-ridesharing services, most of them
homegrown apps launched over the last three years.23 In
Africa, online talent platforms have the potential to create
significant benefits by moving people from informal to
formal jobs, by increasing workforce participation and
hours worked of those formerly underemployed or inactive,
by shortening the duration of job searches and by enabling
matches that would otherwise not have happened.24
By 2025, this could result in 536,000 additional full-time
equivalent jobs and a US$3bn increase in GDP in Kenya,
861,000 jobs and US$20bn in South Africa, and 1.9
million jobs and US$20bn additional GDP in Nigeria.25
As elsewhere, African companies will increasingly need
to learn to manage a distributed, virtual workforce, to
integrate virtual freelance workers and to mitigate the
challenges engaging in online work.

 

Future-ready strategies
The current spread of education and skills across
generations and the expected future trajectory of jobs point
to particular strategies for the region to ensure that it is
prepared for the labour markets of the future.
Recent World Economic Forum research on Realizing
Human Potential in the Fourth Industrial Revolution,
developed through in-depth consultation with leading
experts and practitioners, recommends a number of levers
for creating stronger education systems, including: 1)
expanded access to early-childhood education; 2) ensuring
the ‘future-readiness’ of curricula; 3) investing in developing
and maintaining a professionalized teaching workforce; 4)
early exposure to the workplace and career guidance; 5)
investing in digital fluency and ICT literacy skills; 6) providing
robust and respected technical and vocational education
and training (TVET); 7) creating a culture of lifelong learning;
and 8) openness to education innovation.26
All eight areas apply to the region and it must ensure that
access is universal, leadership of reforms is drawn from
multiple sectors and that new education systems are
designed for the long-term, while maintain agility to cope
with the constant pace of change.
This section highlights four particular areas for strategic
focus: ensuring the ‘future-readiness’ of curricula,
especially through a focus on STEM fields; investing in
digital fluency and ICT literacy skills; providing robust and
respected technical and vocational education and training
(TVET); and creating a culture of lifelong learning including
the provision of adult training and upskilling infrastructure.

However, future job growth will not be limited to the

technology sector alone. Investment in Sub-Saharan
Africa’s enormous infrastructure needs, such as
improvements in the continent’s transport networks,
is booming. While the potential benefits of such “hard”
infrastructure investments are well-recognized, economists
predict equivalent or greater – often untapped – job
creation potential of investments in countries’ “soft”
infrastructure of childcare, eldercare and education, which
also often produce more gender-balanced labour market
outcomes. For example, the direct and indirect job creation
effects of an investment of 2% of GDP in South Africa
would amount to 511,000 jobs in construction (with 29.6%
of direct jobs going to women) and 414,000 jobs in care
(with 61.4% of direct jobs going to women).20 Investing
in the care economy also dovetails with the recognized
importance of early-childhood education for human capital
development. In addition, millions of new teachers will also
be needed across the continent.21
The transition to a more ecologically sustainable economic
model also has the potential to create millions of new jobs
globally, including in Sub-Saharan Africa. For example, it
is estimated that by 2025 South Africa alone could create
462,000 additional jobs by “going green”, including in clean
energy generation, energy efficiency, pollution control and
natural resource management. Similar estimates exist for
countries such as Mauritius, Namibia, Kenya, Senegal,
Uganda and Zambia.22
Finally, regardless of sector or occupation, new work
formats are offering individuals and entrepreneurs new
opportunities. Online platform work is on the rise globally,
including in Sub-Saharan Africa. For example, the continent
currently has 56 e-ridesharing services, most of them
homegrown apps launched over the last three years.23 In
Africa, online talent platforms have the potential to create
significant benefits by moving people from informal to
formal jobs, by increasing workforce participation and
hours worked of those formerly underemployed or inactive,
by shortening the duration of job searches and by enabling
matches that would otherwise not have happened.24
By 2025, this could result in 536,000 additional full-time
equivalent jobs and a US$3bn increase in GDP in Kenya,
861,000 jobs and US$20bn in South Africa, and 1.9
million jobs and US$20bn additional GDP in Nigeria.25
As elsewhere, African companies will increasingly need
to learn to manage a distributed, virtual workforce, to
integrate virtual freelance workers and to mitigate the
challenges engaging in online work.
Future-ready strategies
The current spread of education and skills across
generations and the expected future trajectory of jobs point
to particular strategies for the region to ensure that it is
prepared for the labour markets of the future.
Recent World Economic Forum research on Realizing
Human Potential in the Fourth Industrial Revolution,
developed through in-depth consultation with leading
experts and practitioners, recommends a number of levers
for creating stronger education systems, including: 1)
expanded access to early-childhood education; 2) ensuring
the ‘future-readiness’ of curricula; 3) investing in developing
and maintaining a professionalized teaching workforce; 4)
early exposure to the workplace and career guidance; 5)
investing in digital fluency and ICT literacy skills; 6) providing
robust and respected technical and vocational education
and training (TVET); 7) creating a culture of lifelong learning;
and 8) openness to education innovation.26
All eight areas apply to the region and it must ensure that
access is universal, leadership of reforms is drawn from
multiple sectors and that new education systems are
designed for the long-term, while maintain agility to cope
with the constant pace of change.
This section highlights four particular areas for strategic
focus: ensuring the ‘future-readiness’ of curricula,
especially through a focus on STEM fields; investing in
digital fluency and ICT literacy skills; providing robust and
respected technical and vocational education and training
(TVET); and creating a culture of lifelong learning including
the provision of adult training and upskilling infrastructure.

Education and skills across generations
Sub-Saharan Africa has among the lowest number of years
of formal education amid its older generations, although
this data does not account for alternative modes of learning
such as informal apprenticeships, learning on the job and
traditional knowledge systems that have provided learning
and training opportunities for millions of working-age
Africans with little formal, curriculum-based qualifications
(Figure 9).10 In younger cohorts, extensive investment
in education has vastly improved the composition of
education and skills in the region. As documented in the
African Union’s recently adopted Continental Education
Strategy for Africa 2016–2025, the overall pyramid of
African education as it stands shows a fairly broad base,
at 79% adjusted net enrolment in primary school (up from
59% little more than a decade ago) – equivalent to 144
million African school-age children now accessing primary
education. However, enrolment at secondary level drops to
50% and only 7% of young people are enrolled in tertiary
education

Overall, Sub-Saharan Africa’s younger generations are
considerably more educated—with much higher productive
employment potential—than their predecessors (Figure 10).
In countries such as Nigeria, Botswana, Benin, Uganda,
Malawi and Mozambique the contrast in the education
levels of older and younger generations is particularly
striking. The combined effects of rising post-basic
education attainment and the large proportion of young
people across the region present Sub-Saharan Africa with
a unique demographic opportunity. If current demographic
and education trends continue, the continent’s workingage

population is set to increase by two-thirds by 2030,
from 370 million adults in 2010 to over 600 million in 2030,
while the share of this population with at least a secondary
education is set to increase from 36% in 2010 to 52% in
2030 (Figure 11).
This progress, while setting up more people than ever
before for building their future livelihoods, still leaves a very
significant portion of the population behind on education,
a deficit that will last for decades across multiple
generations. The overall expansion in education also masks
disparities and uneven outcomes across various segments
of the education system. There is currently a lack of
upstream and downstream coordination between Africa’s
primary, secondary and tertiary education providers and
the region’s pre-primary, technical and vocational, adult
training and non-formal education systems remain unevenly
developed. In addition, Sub-Saharan Africa retains the
largest gender gap in the education of girls and boys of any
world region, limiting the breadth of Sub-Saharan Africa’s
available talent pool and furthering social and economic
disparities between women and men later in life

For those who are enrolled in schools and universities,
African education systems’ quality and ability to meet
the needs of a competitive economy, as perceived by
respondents to the World Economic Forum’s Executive
Opinion Survey, remain a concern. They rank significantly
below the global average—suggesting that learners
are not acquiring the knowledge and skills required for
today’s economies and societies (Figure 12). This is further
corroborated by business leaders’ concerns about the
difficulty of finding skilled workers for their businesses.
Finally, for those who are a part of the continent’s
high-skilled white collar workforce (Figure 13), the data
reveals that 35% of LinkedIn’s tertiary-educated African
members hold Business, Administration and Law
degrees—dominated by specialization in accounting
and complemented by qualifications in law, business
management, banking, finance, marketing and human
resources. The data also suggests the availability of a fairly
large science, technology, engineering and mathematics
(STEM) and information and communication technology
(ICT) talent pool, comprising nearly 40% of the LinkedIn
sample and split between specialization in Engineering,
Manufacturing and Construction (16%), Information and
Communication Technologies (11%), and Natural Sciences,
Mathematics and Statistics (11%). Within Engineering,
Manufacturing and Construction, more than half of
graduates have focused on electrical, civil, mechanical or
chemical engineering, or architecture and urban design.
Among those with an ICT qualification, the large majority
are specialized in either computer science or in developing
and maintaining information systems and databases. A
much smaller cohort of African professionals have studied
hardware and software engineering and only a select few
have focused on artificial intelligence. Among those who
have specialised in Natural Sciences, Mathematics and
Statistics, more than half have studied basic sciences such
as biology, chemistry or mathematics, while more than one
in six have focused on applied fields such as biochemistry,
bioinformatics, neuroscience or environmental science

 

DEVELOPMENT & IMPACT: Southern Africa Youth Project understands that in whatever service we provide to the communities must have an exit strategy. Beneficiaries or clients must be able to move on with their lives without us. Southern Africa Youth Project believes and understands that a child belongs to the community not to someone or an organisation.

CAPACITY: Southern Africa Youth Project works with Local Communities providing Capacity Building, Community Systems Strengthening to ensure that beyond Southern Africa Youth Project support to those communities. These communities will be able to provide services on their own.

EMPOWERMENT: Southern Africa Youth Project firmly believes that we need to ensure that we develop our own staff members by engaging them in life long learning so that they renewed. When they are renewed they will be able to empower the Youth in communities:

LEADERSHIP:  Southern Africa Youth Project believes that in addressing socio-economic challenges we need to look at 365 degrees approach but having a start by looking at what exists in communities. We have strong respect for traditional leaders, chiefs, kings, governments and local structures

Southern Africa Youth Project and its leadership have been nominated and won the following 19 awards.

2011 Winner Shoprite Community Network

2012 Nominee Google Zeitgeist

2012 Fellow Fetola Legends

2012 Winner Fetola Best in Sales

2012 Fetola Best New Comer

2013 Top 30 young people to look for

2013 Finalist Anzisha Prize

2013 Fellow Anzisha Prize

2014 Fellow Branson Centre of Entrepreneurship

2014 Nominee NSFT BHP Billiton Award

2015 Fellow Royal Commonwealth Society

2015 The South African Top 10 Entrepreneurs

2015 Winner Africa Growth, Innovation and Leadership

2016 Finalist Young Independents

2016 Honorary Award by the Presidency South Africa

2016 Drum Magazine Youth Entrepreneur

2017 Gauteng Service Excellence Award

2018 Social Development NPO of the year

Southern Africa Youth Project is managed by the board who are comprised of experienced professionals who provides advisory, monitoring, compliance, evaluation and independent oversight to the organization. The organization is led by the Chief Executive Officer who is supported by the Chief Operations Officer/General Manager, Chief Monitoring Officer and Chief Financial Officer who ensures that all pillars of the organization are properly functioning and there is accountability in Finance, Operations, and Administration.

The organization has staff members working at head office level, country, regional, local and partner organizations. These are managed by experienced and qualified managers who ensure that they look at delivery, monitoring, and evaluation.

Southern Africa Youth Project understands that capacity might not be available internally. We, therefore, work with companies and individuals from outside who provides advisory, consulting and also facilitates other roles and responsibilities the organization might not have internally.

The organization takes development seriously. Where we question the impact of the work that we do on a daily basis.

We ask the following questions:

1.       What are you doing?

2.       How are you doing it?

3.       When are you doing it?

4.       How is technology going to be factored in what you are doing?

5.       Then what happens?

If all these questions are answered by the board, senior management, management, administrators, project staff we are therefore satisfied that we are now ready to roll out the work we want to implement.

<h5>Southern Africa Youth Project becomes an international institution with headquarters in South Africa.</h5><h5>Southern Africa Youth Project introduces the Technology, Education, Health and Employment Strategy</h5>       
                                    <img width="550" height="550" src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/southern-africa-youth-project-map-southern-africa-3.jpg" alt="Southern Africa Youth Project map Southern Africa 3" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/southern-africa-youth-project-map-southern-africa-3.jpg?w=550&amp;ssl=1 550w, https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/southern-africa-youth-project-map-southern-africa-3.jpg?resize=150%2C150&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/southern-africa-youth-project-map-southern-africa-3.jpg?resize=300%2C300&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/southern-africa-youth-project-map-southern-africa-3.jpg?resize=60%2C60&amp;ssl=1 60w" sizes="(max-width: 550px) 100vw, 550px" />                                           
        18      
        <h4><b>2018</b></h4>        
    <h5>Southern Africa Youth Project revised its strategy to become an international organisation introducing work into other African countries</h5>       
                                    <img src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/alexis-work-step-2.jpg" title="" alt="" />                                         
        17      
        <h4><b>2017</b></h4>        
    <h5>We revised the Poverty2Jobs where the programs were structured to enable girls to use technology for their advancement. Where our focus is on providing educational support for the girl child, capacity building for the unemployed youth and linking unemployed youth to jobs and opportunities. Southern Africa Youth Project re branded as an international organization. Where our operations are to be in South Africa and beyond borders</h5>        
                                    <img src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/3.jpg" title="" alt="" />                                          
        16      
        <h4><b>2016</b></h4>        
    <h5>Atok branch (Sekhukhune, Limpopo, South Africa) was adopted and changed to Southern Africa Youth Project</h5>       
                                    <img src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/alesiz-2.jpg" title="" alt="" />                                           
        15      
        <h4><b>2015</b></h4>        
    <h5>Diepsloot Youth Project was changed to Southern Africa Youth Project focusing more on poverty to jobs model offering advice, referral services, computer training, bead works, crafts, carpentry training. Southern Africa Youth Project was registered as a Non Profit company</h5>        
                                    <img width="3264" height="2448" src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/20180719-111505-e1539771478379.jpg" alt="20180719 111505 e1539771478379" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/20180719-111505-e1539771478379.jpg?w=3264&amp;ssl=1 3264w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/20180719-111505-e1539771478379.jpg?resize=300%2C225&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/20180719-111505-e1539771478379.jpg?resize=768%2C576&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/20180719-111505-e1539771478379.jpg?resize=1024%2C768&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/20180719-111505-e1539771478379.jpg?resize=80%2C60&amp;ssl=1 80w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/20180719-111505-e1539771478379.jpg?resize=600%2C450&amp;ssl=1 600w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/20180719-111505-e1539771478379.jpg?w=1694&amp;ssl=1 1694w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/20180719-111505-e1539771478379.jpg?w=2541&amp;ssl=1 2541w" sizes="(max-width: 3264px) 100vw, 3264px" />                                           
        14      
        <h4><b>2014</b></h4>        
    <h5>Southern Africa Youth Project conducts a rigorous research and planning with community members and stakeholders on the ground to ensure that the work we implement speaks to what they are looking for.</h5>        
                                    <img width="847" height="476" src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/20180915-110405-1024x576.jpg" alt="20180915 110405" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/20180915-110405.jpg?resize=1024%2C576&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/20180915-110405.jpg?resize=300%2C169&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/20180915-110405.jpg?resize=768%2C432&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/20180915-110405.jpg?resize=107%2C60&amp;ssl=1 107w, https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/20180915-110405.jpg?resize=600%2C338&amp;ssl=1 600w, https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/20180915-110405.jpg?w=1694&amp;ssl=1 1694w, https://i2.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/20180915-110405.jpg?w=2541&amp;ssl=1 2541w" sizes="(max-width: 847px) 100vw, 847px" />                                           
        `12     
        <h4><b>2012</b></h4>        
    <h5>Diepsloot Youth Project changed its logo from the drums to using hands and now it was focusing more on crafts, drama, dance, computer training, and sewing</h5>     
                                    <img width="847" height="635" src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/img-0217-1024x768.jpg" alt="IMG 0217" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/img-0217.jpg?resize=1024%2C768&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/img-0217.jpg?resize=300%2C225&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/img-0217.jpg?resize=768%2C576&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/img-0217.jpg?resize=80%2C60&amp;ssl=1 80w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/img-0217.jpg?resize=600%2C450&amp;ssl=1 600w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/img-0217.jpg?w=1694&amp;ssl=1 1694w, https://i1.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/img-0217.jpg?w=2541&amp;ssl=1 2541w" sizes="(max-width: 847px) 100vw, 847px" />                                            
        11      
        <h4><b>2011</b></h4>        
    <h5>Diepsloot Youth Arts Culture Project was changed to Diepsloot Youth Projects focused more on crafts, drama, dance, computer and training</h5>       
                                    <img width="847" height="635" src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/img-20180509-wa0033-1024x768.jpg" alt="IMG 20180509 WA0033" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/img-20180509-wa0033.jpg?resize=1024%2C768&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/img-20180509-wa0033.jpg?resize=300%2C225&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/img-20180509-wa0033.jpg?resize=768%2C576&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/img-20180509-wa0033.jpg?resize=80%2C60&amp;ssl=1 80w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/img-20180509-wa0033.jpg?resize=600%2C450&amp;ssl=1 600w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/img-20180509-wa0033.jpg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w" sizes="(max-width: 847px) 100vw, 847px" />                                          
        08      
        <h4><b>2008</b></h4>        
    <h5>2008: Neftaly Malatjie passed Grade 12 and could not further his studies. However, he obtained a photography, journalism and computer training course through a local non-profit organization. He then went to an organization called SANCA. where he saw an empty space that was not utilized. Neftaly requested SANCA if they can give him space. Sanca was so excited that they also offered Neftaly Malatjie R1 000 or $82 per month. Neftaly Malatjie used this income to support DIepsloot Youth Project now known as Southern Africa Youth Project. Out of the income, he got he established things such as beadwork, craft, pottery and could support the afternoon care program. This means that Neftaly Malatjie used his savings to support the organization.</h5>       
                                    <img src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/alexis-work-step-1.jpg" title="" alt="" />                                         
        07      
        <h4><b>2007</b></h4>        
    <h5>2007: Neftaly Malatjie at 16 years had passed to Grade 12 where he had to focus more on obtaining better marks. That did not stop him from continuing with the group. The group continued performing at Rabasotho Combined School. The group now changed members who were between 18 and 23 years at that time. Neftaly Malatjie enjoyed their attention where they obeyed his leadership. However, some school learners mocked him for keeping these girls busy at the school.</h5><h5>Rabasotho Combined School</h5>      
                                    <img src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/outhern-Africa-Youth-Project-Refuees-Clifford-Legodi.jpg" title="" alt="" />                                           
        06      
        <h4><b>2006</b></h4>        
    <h5>2006: The group grew from 10 members to 60 members and Neftaly had to add other young volunteers to serve as the administration</h5>        
                                    <img width="847" height="476" src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/20180526-083326-1024x576.jpg" alt="20180526 083326" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/20180526-083326.jpg?resize=1024%2C576&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/20180526-083326.jpg?resize=300%2C169&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/20180526-083326.jpg?resize=768%2C432&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/20180526-083326.jpg?resize=107%2C60&amp;ssl=1 107w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/20180526-083326.jpg?resize=600%2C338&amp;ssl=1 600w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/20180526-083326.jpg?w=1694&amp;ssl=1 1694w, https://i0.wp.com/southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/20180526-083326.jpg?w=2541&amp;ssl=1 2541w" sizes="(max-width: 847px) 100vw, 847px" />                                           
        05      
        <h4>2005</h4>       
    <ul><li>Founded by Neftaly Malatjie at the age of 14 Years</li></ul><ul><li>Founded as Diepsloot Youth Arts and Culture Project</li></ul><ul><li>Worked with 10 Girls and Boys between ages 10 - 16 Years</li></ul><ul><li>Founded during School Holidays</li></ul><ul><li>Operating at Sanca Diepsloot</li></ul>       
                                    <img src="https://southernafricayouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/IMG_0103.jpg" title="" alt="" />
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